We Are All Welcome Here

We Are All Welcome Here

A Novel

Book - 2006
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In Tupelo, Mississippi in 1964, three women struggle for independence. Paige Dunn, paralyzed from the neck down by the effects of polio, is determined to raise her daughter, Diana, alone. Diana, at 14, longs to be free of the responsibility of caring for her mother, while their fiercely protective black caregiver, Peacie, fears for the safety of her boyfriend who is risking his life in the civil rights movement.
Publisher: New York : Random House, c2006.
Edition: 1st ed. --
ISBN: 9781400061617
140006161X
Characteristics: xiii, 187 p.

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h
HollyDavis022
Aug 05, 2015

Initially hard for me to get into this story told through the child's view, but it really picked up for me. Set in an interesting time in U.S. history with strong characters.

f
FerndaleAdultSRC
Jun 23, 2015

This book has been on my bookshelf for a long time and I finally had time to read it. I was not disappointed. It is such a good story of family, struggle, hope and dealing with the life you've been born into. This was my first Elizabeth Berg book, but it won't be my last.

prkmbc Sep 10, 2011

June 2006

c
Carterpenj
Nov 23, 2010

An excellent book. Inspired by Pat Raming and her daughter Marianne Raming Burke, this is the story of a women paralyzed by polio (Paige Dunn), who raises her daughter with the help of Peacie and Mrs. Gruder. Diana, the daughter is a typical adolescent when we meet her. The mother-daughter relationship is very special. The story handles human rights issues and is set in the context of the Civil Rights marches of the 1960's. Heavy topics that are not treated as such. Wonderful characters, and a 'can't put it down" book. Uplifting.

nadian Apr 27, 2008

The fact that this novel is based upon a true mother and daughter makes is extraordinary to begin with, but as the novel goes on, the unbelievable restraints that Paige has to go through becomes more and more apparent. Unfortunately the novel lacked a real driving plot line that would have made it truly captivating. Instead the story is a small, albeit unusual, one.

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nadian Apr 29, 2008

Violence: Minor descriptions of beatings and injuries.

nadian Apr 29, 2008

Sexual Content: A few scenes with mild sexuality.

nadian Apr 29, 2008

Coarse Language: One or two adult words.

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nadian Apr 29, 2008

nadian thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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nadian Apr 27, 2008

It is the summer of 1964. In Tupelo, Mississippi, the town of Elvis's birth, tensions are mounting over civil-rights demonstrations occurring even more frequently- and violently- across the state. But in Paige Dunn's small, ramshackle house, there are more immediate concerns. Challenged by the effects of polio she contracted during her last month of pregnancy, Paige is nonetheless determined to live as normal a life as possible and to raise her daughter, Diana, in the way she sees fit- with the support of her tough-talking black caregiver, Peacie.
Diana is trying in her own fashion to live a normal life. As a fourteen-year-old, she wants to make money for clothes and magazines, to slough off the authority of her mother and Peacie, to figure out the puzzle that is boys, and to escape the oppressiveness she sees everywhere in her small town. What she can never escape, however, is the way her life is markedly different from others'. Nor can she escape her ongoing responsibility to assist in caring for her mother. Paige Dunn is attractive, charming, intelligent, and lively, but her needs are great- and relentless.
As the summer unfolds, hate and adversity will visit this modest home. Despite the difficulties thrust upon each of them, each of the women will find her own path to independence, understanding, and peace. And Diana's mother, so mightily compromised will end up giving her daughter and extraordinary gift few parents could match.
-From inside cover

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