Being Mortal

Being Mortal

Medicine and What Matters in the End

Audiobook CD - 2014
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Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending. Full of eye-opening research and riveting storytelling, Gawande asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end.
Publisher: New York. : Macmillan Audio, p2014.
ISBN: 9781427244239
Characteristics: 7 sound discs (9 hr.) :,digital ;,4 3/4 in.
Additional Contributors: Petkoff, Robert

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AL_LESLEY Dec 22, 2016

A very important subject matter written with feeling and skill. Not many people think about our mortality in this practical way and I believe it is necessary that we all do so. Great narrator and excellent book.

t
TheresaAJ
Jun 30, 2016

Gawande, a surgeon at Boston Hospital, explores how modern medicine has created a system that makes terminally ill patients suffer unnecessarily. Using personal stories, including his father's, the author pleads for his readers to have that "hard conversation" with their loved ones. As he says, "When a doctor presents treatment options to a terminally ill patient, he or she is thinking of extending life by weeks or months. However, the patient hears that life will go on for another 10 or 20 years." A provocative book that everyone should read.

d
durogoff
Jun 22, 2016

It is a valuable contribution to the ongoing end of life arguments.
But it is from a very traditional physician's point of view: drugs for pain, chemotherapy and surgery for cancer and heart failures. It does not add to the right to end life discussions and legislation in Canada and/or some USA states, not to mention the right to active end of life as in Switzerland or the Netherlands, to mention just two jurisdictions. Nor does it mention alternative palliative/pain care: morphine is acceptable, how about marijuana?
Still, a recommended reading/listening, as it shows where the mainstream medical establishment is going on the issue. And to prepare yourself if you do not intend to follow that path.

s
sassafras
Sep 23, 2015

Excellent! I think everyone should read this book and have that difficult conversation with their family and their doctor. The best parts of the book were the personal stories which put the reader in the shoes of the author's patients. The stories make you consider the hard choices people, and probably you, will have to make someday. Hopefully this book will prompt the medical establishment to make changes in how end-of-life is handled. And also encourage patients to actively make choices about how they want to spend their final years/days and make those choices known to medical staff in order to have the peace we all deserve at the end.

l
LDZ2
Sep 08, 2015

This book is a difficult read for many, simply because the subject matter is so new to most of us. We are all going to die, but rarely do we think about how it is going to happen and what we want the end of our life to look like.

It took me a while to get through the book, because I found the subject matter so difficult, but I'm glad I did! I truly think it's a must read, because most of us will have to face death and aging (if were lucky!) or help others do the same.

k
kmmkwong
Jul 22, 2015

One of the most meaningful and eye-opening books I have ever read. Death or just getting old shouldn't be be a taboo subject yet it is so often overlooked until maybe we have no choice but to face it. So it is great to have a book to really, seriously, talk about it.

Lots of insight, and great personal stories and vision for where things as a modern society should go.

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