Small Gods

Small Gods

Book - 1992
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Lost in the chill deeps of space between the galaxies, it sails on forever, a flat, circular world carried on the back of a giant turtle. Discworld a land where the unexpected can be expected. Where the strangest things happen to the nicest people. Like Brutha, a simple lad who only wants to tend his melon patch. Until one day he hears the voice of a god calling his name. A small god, to be sure. But bossy as Hell.
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins, 1992.
ISBN: 9780060177508
0060177500
Characteristics: 272 p.

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JCLRachelC Jun 22, 2017

This is my recommended starting point for Discworld novels. It's standalone, so you don't need to know the backstory of a dozen characters, but it's far enough in that the original books' parody of high fantasy has evolved into satire and biting social commentary.

A beautifully written, very funny, and very insightful novel from a great literary voice.

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KYMK2014
Dec 29, 2015

Brutha, a calm, and simple man, weeding the gardens in the Citadel, was shocked when a demon spoke to him. Even more so, when it claimed to be his God, the great God Om. And he became even more suspicious, when he saw that it appeared to be a small, one-eyed tortoise.

Brutha, the last true believer in the great Omnian empire, has awoken the great God Om from his slumber. The more believers a God has, the more powerful it is. When the great God Om decided to manifest as a swan or bull, he simply appeared as a little tortoise, and slowly forgot he was a God. He wandered away from his last true believer in search of food. Only now, does he realize his life is in danger. To make things worse, his last believer is an idiot. However, Brutha does have one advantage; a photographic memory. When this is discovered, they are forced to journey to foreign lands, by the church Quisition, to aid in the start of a great holy war. Brutha doesn't want that. Om doesn't want that. Neither do the soldiers. Only the deacon of the Quisition, Vorbis, really wants the massacre.

I thought this book was insightful, unique. It manages to review the flaws of organized religions from the past, without putting down all the people in the church. It discredits people who try to use religion as a tool, for their personal gain, but not the rest of the people,who were forced to to along with it.

This was a great book. It's part of the Discworld series, but is okay to be read first, even though chronologically, it isn't first. The series is organised into several subseries, but this is a standalone novel. If you like this book, it's also a good introduction to the rest of the series. It has great humor, and references to world history, popular British phrases, as is expected of the Discworld. It is arguably one of the best Terry Pratchett books.

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LazyNeko
Jan 17, 2012

As funny as it was to read about the God Om stuck as a tortoise, which apparently is good eatin', I had trouble connecting with the human characters in the book.

s
styellow
Mar 08, 2011

laugh out loud kind of book

ivysmudge Nov 16, 2010

Best Author EVER!! You have to read one of Terry Pratchett's books.

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LazyNeko
Jan 17, 2012

The trouble with being a god is that you've got no one to pray to.

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